By Scott Keith

As many of you may know, I am a zealous advocate for doing apologetics. Apologetics is defined as the defense of the Christian faith. The simplicity of this definition, however, does not help one understand the complexity of the problem of defining apologetics. There is a great diversity of approaches when approaching the task of doing apologetics. Accordingly, I have learned and practiced apologetic techniques myself, and I have spent many years teaching them to others. For the most part, I use the evidential argument, but there are other methods as well.

By Scott Keith

*This week, I have given my spot over to my good friend and mentor Johan Hinderlie. Besides putting up with me as a friend, Johan has served as a radio preacher, Bible camp director, parish pastor, and tour leader. But he gets most of his fun pretending he is Martin Luther. Sometimes his wife acts alongside him as Katy von Bora. They live in Minnesota enjoying their three married sons and six grandchildren. Enjoy!*

By Scott Keith

Do you ever notice that Christians tend to treat their salvation like a participatory event? We act as if we had some hand in and that without our help, God will never be able to see it through to completion. We strut about as though we not only have something to be proud of but as if we deserve some heavenly credit. We wait, I think, for God to say thank you to us someday for all our hard work pulling ourselves up by our bootstraps. In fact, we all seem rather disappointed that God has not reached down from heaven and patted us on the back already.

By Scott Keith

(Today, my wife, Joy Keith, has stepped up to proclaim a little Gospel to the readers of The Jagged Word. Enjoy.)

As I was growing up as a Gen-X-er on the South Side of Chicago, my parents used many a classic turn of phrase assumingly trying to teach my brothers and me life lessons. Things like, “If you eat your (insert canned green vegetable of your choice here), you’ll grow hair on your chest.” Or, “Don’t cross your eyes too long or they’ll stay like that forever,” “Don’t speak unless spoken to!” “Children are to be seen and not heard!” “Actions speak louder than words.” So, as the only daughter, I sure as shooting wasn’t going to eat green vegetables, and I didn’t want to marry a guy who did. EWWWW! Recently, as I am a grandmother (who knows better and loves her FRESH green vegetables), I am watching my own kids who are moving out, becoming adults, growing up, and being parents themselves, I’ve been reflecting on some of my life before I left my childhood home.

By Scott Keith

Look at me! It’s cliché. In our age full of social media, selfies, and self-aggrandizement, we all want people to look at us. We want to be noticed. We want to be famous, if even for 15 seconds. We want the world to love us. It starts when we are young and just learning to do this or that, and we yell out to mom and dad, “look at me,” and it only gets worse from there.

By Scott Keith

The Search

Thus, we are at the end of our brief investigation of Philip Melanchthon; his theology, teaching, writings (especially the Loci Communes), work as a theological ambassador, reformer, and good friend of Martin Luther. Too, this short series has attempted to show that many, if not all, of the attempts that have been made to reveal or identify tensions or error in Melanchthon’s theology, have arisen primarily from anachronistic presuppositions of inconsistencies with Luther, or problems that have their grounding in modern systematic and dogmatic relevancies.

By Scott Keith

A Recap

The Reformation was firmly ensconced in the German lands and began to move to other countries. It even reached France. In 1534, Melanchthon was invited to France to defend the Lutheran position to King Francis, who seemed to favor the Reformation. Melanchthon responded that he would do what was within his power for the sake of true religion (CR: 2, 739). Melanchthon expressed a fond willingness to accept the invitation, though John Fredrick, his elector, refused to grant him leave to go. The refusal of permission to travel did not stop Melanchthon from keeping up correspondences with interested parties in France.