I am not passionate about politics…at all. Of course, I hold a general ideology and perspective on how I think our country ought to be governed, but I find more value in pouring time and energy into fostering my relationships with the people around me who actually impact my life on a daily basis, than I do staying up to date on the nuances and intricacies of national or international politics. So, when I say that I sit here, a week after election day, saddened and disappointed, it has nothing to do with the projected winner. I’m frustrated by the inflammatory rhetoric I saw flying from both sides. I’m disheartened by everyone’s apparent inability to empathize with people who think differently than they do, or to even see a reason to. 

I think it is safe to say that most Americans have at least tasted the end of the Founders’ experiment this past year. I am not necessarily saying it is going to end today. Though it might spoil like milk soon. But it has become incredibly evident that just like your personal life, it only takes a couple bad choices and you are outside begging for your abusive boyfriend to take you back.

When someone mentions the church and politics in the same sentence, the picture most people flash on is a pastor standing in the pulpit, waving a red or blue flag, and telling you why it would make Jesus happy if you voted for a particular candidate or a specific proposition. It is an off-putting image for many, and accusations of preachers exceeding their authority or manipulating congregations often follow. To avoid this, then, churches swing all the way in the other direction, to where we do not want to talk about politics at all in the church. Keep church and state separate, as they ought to be. There is, however, a middle ground between littering the church lawn with campaign signs and making politics a taboo subject.

“In the year that King Uzziah died I saw the Lord sitting upon the throne, high and lifted up…”

Isaiah 6:1

The signs are all around us. We just don’t want them to be real, or at least we don’t want them to mean what they seem intent on conveying. After all, it’s that special time of year when everything appears to carry more weight. So, we take comfortable stances and head down familiar roads. Once again we are told that this election is the most important election of our lifetime, there is more at stake, more to gain if my side wins and more to lose if those idiots try and steal the election.