By Caleb Keith

Before everybody thinks I am a jerk, let me just say that I care about how you feel in the proper sense of the word that describes your emotional status. If you are happy, I am glad you feel that way. If you are sad, I sympathize with your distraught. I don’t care about how you feel in what I will call the “weak” sense of the word, that is the sense of the word which attempts to replace knowledge and indicative reality with uncertainty and personal probability.

By Caleb Keith

Two days ago, I started my last year as an undergraduate student. The semester ahead is going to be no easy task. I am taking eighteen units, including courses in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. On top of that, I have my five-month-old daughter to care for, and I was stupid enough to get a puppy, which my wife will be picking up tomorrow. It is safe to say that I have a hefty challenge laid out before me. However, this challenge is not uninvited.

By Caleb Keith

In my day-to-day life, I like to think I write more than the average person, not because I have more to say but because it is the nature of being a student to write. During the school year, I write papers, essays, short-answer responses, and the like. My work also requires me to write. At 1517 the Legacy Project, I write Facebook and Twitter posts, emails to co-workers, and the copies for the Thinking Fellows podcast. Then there is The Jagged Word, which I write for once a week, supplying a short blog for your viewing pleasure.

By Caleb Keith

Over the years I’ve come to enjoy the series of Jason Bourne movies. Things were no different last Thursday when I went to see the latest sequel. 2016’s Jason Bourne follows the same basic formula as every Bourne film.  Step 1. Bourne comes out of hiding, Step 2. The CIA locates Bourne, Step 3. Bourne stops the corrupt CIA from some nefarious and internationally illegal scheme.  While the movie was certainly predictable, the formula still works especially with the movies new technological focus.

By Caleb Keith

Recently, there has been a flood of violence and unrest following both Islamic terror attacks and domestic shootings. As is typical in the United States, such violence has led to a nationwide argument about gun control. As arguments both for and against gun control go flying through the air, I have found one particular argument coming from Christians more bothersome than the rest. Many Christians, both evangelical and Catholic, have labeled it sinful and un-Christian to own guns. This argument stems from what I would call the “Not of this World” movement. These Christians tend to overemphasize the spiritual aspect of the Christian life while often demonizing or ignoring the worldly part.

By Caleb Keith

Today, I spent approximately four hours separating, organizing, and scanning various papers, articles, and magazines for Dr. Rod Rosenbladt. Since his retirement last fall, I have been assisting him with various aspects of the transition. This has meant moving a lot of books and sorting through a lot of paper. Most of that sorting involves scanning important documents so that he no longer needs to keep stacks of papers. Today, I was excited as I opened up one of the last boxes labeled “Scan.”