By Caleb Keith

I have vivid memories of the first day I was allowed to ride my bike to school all by myself. The ride was only about a mile and half long and consisted of calm city streets that had a max speed limit of 25 mph. At the time, I saw no signs of danger and didn’t understand the risk my parents were taking by letting me embark on this journey. Instead, all I imagined was bragging to my friends when I finally got to class. Looking back now, I see how easily I could have been hurt or killed by one poor decision or a distracted driver. I am so glad that my parents let me take those risks, as it brought me great joy and taught me that the rules of the road aren’t arbitrary guidelines set by mom and dad, but that following or breaking them could have a real impact on my life.

By Caleb Keith

Dear Jagged Mafia,

I let the month of February get the best of me. I was bummed out by some pastoral harassment and overwhelmed by the beginning of a new semester. I let these two things feed into my natural laziness, but it’s time to shake off the slump. With that in mind, I thought it would be appropriate to highlight the last two episodes of the Thinking Fellows podcast. On these two fantastic shows, the fellows and I were joined by none other than the Jagged Word’s very own Pastor Koch. On recording day, we enjoyed fine whiskey and pipe smoke while talking about friendship and preaching the Law and the Gospel. I personally believe that these are some of the best episodes we have ever recorded.

By Caleb Keith

Last week, I started what will be my last semester as an undergraduate student, and boy does it feel sweet. As week two begins, I am feeling the hurt as the work begins to stack up. For my last semester, I decided to torture myself by taking three classical languages: Hebrew, Greek, and Latin. Primarily taking language classes is nice because there are no research papers due at the end of the semester. However, the time and energy I gain from not writing papers is quickly sapped away by memory work. Vocab cards need flipping, paradigm charts need filling, and I could use a drink. Memory work is vital to language study, but it isn’t the whole picture. Memory work can’t be blind; it must have a purpose or goal for it to be worthwhile. When I study, I do not do so with the intention to have a bunch of random words and charts in my head. I do it with the goal to better understand my world. Memorization is far from understanding, and memorization that never reaches a level of any understanding is hardly worth the time. This is not true only concerning language but concerning everything we put to memory.

By Caleb Keith

I cannot count the number of times I have heard the words “It’s not fair.” The phrase has left my mouth on more than one occasion, especially when I was a child. To this day, my brother and I argue about fairness when it comes to cleaning the dishes or picking up the living room. Our culture is also obsessed with fairness. The social justice movement is a shining example. Its apparent focus is not to protect the rights of individuals but instead to balance the scales. This is seen in phrases like “check your privilege,” which tries to make people see how much of an unfair advantage old white men have over minorities and women. Fairness also came into play after the recent presidential election when the popular vote differed from the electoral college. While some degree of fairness is necessary for good order, it often becomes abused by whiners and gloaters.

By Caleb Keith

The Christian faith is blessed with the ability to be informed and educated. The Lutheran Reformation highlighted and used this gift to its full advantage. Theologians were trained in Greek, Latin, Hebrew, History, Rhetoric, and Logic to better understand the Scriptures and clearly read what God revealed to the authors of the New and Old Testaments. Informed preachers and teachers were then called to proclaim the Gospel message to common people and train them not only to believe but to understand their faith.

By Caleb Keith

Whether you like or hate that Trump won the presidential election, it is undeniable that the liberal community went through a freak-out. Twitter and Facebook were ablaze; college campuses crumbled in tears and some real idiots started blocking freeways. Amidst false cries of racism and bigotry, some liberals acknowledged how they failed and revealed the larger plan for changing the world. It starts with Christianity. You see, Christianity possess a real threat to the political left, not because many Christians find themselves on the political right, but because Christians believe in objectivity when it comes to issues such as morality, science, and law. Modern liberalism relies on a false pluralism, which says that there is no true right or wrong, gender doesn’t exist, and random chance is god.